Yom HaShoah

Yom HaShoah, or Holocaust Remembrance Day, is the day that Jews around the world remember the six million who perished in the Holocaust.  This year Yom HaShoah begins on the evening of April 7 and continues until sundown on April 8.

Holocaust RemembranceSource: CC / Sienda
Source: CC / Sienda

Find out more about the Holocaust, the systematic mass-murder of more than 6 million Jews, and other groups, targeted by the Nazis and their allies:

Documenting the Holocaust

The Holocaust is one of the most well documented events in history. Yet despite this, there are some who seek to distort or deny the facts of this terrible blight on human history. We must continue to fight against the evil that the Holocaust represents. To do so we must fight against lies, distortions and ignorance to ensure that the facts are preserved, as horrifying as the facts are, so that future generations know what happened, and what must never happen again.

#ProtectTheFacts is just one of many organizations dedicated to preserving the historical facts of the Holocaust, and fighting against the evil that is Holocaust denial or distortion. See more in the links below.


Come to the school library to find out more about the Holocaust. Check out some of the following resources:


Find out more:

International Holocaust Remembrance Day

United Nations Outreach Programme on the Holocaust

Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum

Yad Veshem World Holocaust Remembrance Center

Lest We Forget Photo Exhibition

International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance

International Holocaust Remembrance Day

In 2005 the United Nations designated January 27 as International Holocaust Remembrance Day. The term “Holocaust” refers to the period in history in which the Nazi regime of Germany murdered over 6 million Jews, as well as millions of other victims, including Roma, homosexuals, people with physical and mental disabilities, and more. The Nazi persecution of the Jews began in the early 1930’s and reached its most horrific and brutal peak during the period of 1941-1945, as the Nazis adopted as official policy the “Final Solution,” the attempt at completely annihilating the entire Jewish population.

Holocaust RemembranceSource: CC / Sienda
Source: CC / Sienda

The Holocaust is not the only example of genocide in human history. What makes the Holocaust stand out amongst the long and plentiful list of human atrocities and evil?  Germany was amongst the most powerful nations of the world and a leader in science, technology, medicine and engineering.  The German contributions to art, music, literature and philosophy put German culture at the heart of what we would call Western Civilization. And yet this supposedly civilized people turned their great achievements and progress towards planning and carrying out ruthless genocidal murder with scientific and economic efficiency.

Children selected for extermination
source: wikimedia commons / public domain

The date of January 27 was chosen for this solemn observance as the death camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau was liberated on January 27, 1945.

Auschwitz Death Camp
source: Diego Delso, Wikimedia Commons, License CC-BY-SA 3.0

For more on the Holocaust:

Yad Veshem

US Holocaust Memorial Museum

Jewish Virtual Library

Vancouver Holocaust Education Centre

United Nations / UNESCO

Holocaust Survivor visits our School Library

symbol Jews were required to wear, identifying them for persecution and murder
source: wikimedia commons

We are very honoured to welcome Mr. Janos Benisz to the Lord Tweedsmuir Secondary School Library today for a presentation to English and Social Studies classes. Mr. Benisz is a survivor of the Holocaust, the systematic, bureaucratic, state-sponsored persecution and murder of six million Jews and five million non-Jewish civilians by the Nazi regime and its collaborators in the years before and during the Second World War.

The visit of Mr. Benisz is made possible through a program of the Vancouver Holocaust Education Centre. To find out more, please visit vhec.org

International Holocaust Remembrance Day

Auschwitz Death Camp
source: Diego Delso, Wikimedia Commons, License CC-BY-SA 3.0

In 2005 the United Nations designated January 27 as International Holocaust Remembrance Day. The term “Holocaust” refers to the period in history in which the Nazi regime of Germany murdered over 6 million Jews, as well as millions of other victims, including Roma, homosexuals, people with physical and mental disabilities, and more. The Nazi persecution of the Jews began in the early 1930’s and reached its most horrific and brutal peak during the period of 1941-1945, as the Nazis adopted as official policy the “Final Solution,” the attempt at completely annihilating the entire Jewish population.

Children selected for extermination
source: wikimedia commons / public domain

 

The Holocaust is not the only example of genocide in human history. What makes the Holocaust stand out amongst the long and plentiful list of human atrocities and evil?  Germany was amongst the most powerful nations of the world and a leader in science, technology, medicine and engineering.  The German contributions to art, music, literature and philosophy put German culture at the heart of what we would call Western Civilization. And yet this supposedly civilized people turned their great achievements and progress towards planning and carrying out ruthless genocidal murder with scientific and economic efficiency.

For more on the Holocaust:

Yad Veshem

US Holocaust Memorial Museum

Jewish Virtual Library

Vancouver Holocaust Education Centre

Holocaust Memorial Day

By joe goldberg from Seattle, WA, USA (Half Mast) [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
source: CC-BY-SA-2.0 via Wikimedia Commons
Also known as Yom HaShoah in Hebrew, this day is observed in Israel and in local communities throughout the Jewish Diaspora.  It is a secular holiday, separate from the holy days of mourning in the religious calendar of Judaism.

More than 6 million Jews perished in the Holocaust.

For more information:

Jewish Virtual Library

Times of Israel

Vancouver HEC

 

International Holocaust Remembrance Day

Auschwitz Death Camp
source: Diego Delso, Wikimedia Commons, License CC-BY-SA 3.0

In 2005 the United Nations designated January 27 as International Holocaust Remembrance Day. The term “Holocaust” refers to the period in history in which the Nazi regime of Germany murdered over 6 million Jews, as well as millions of other victims, including Roma, homosexuals, people with physical and mental disabilities, and more. The Nazi persecution of the Jews began in the early 1930’s and reached its most horrific and brutal peak during the period of 1941-1945, as the Nazis adopted as official policy the “Final Solution,” the attempt at completely annihilating the entire Jewish population.

Children selected for extermination
source: wikimedia commons / public domain

 

The Holocaust is not the only example of genocide in human history. What makes the Holocaust stand out amongst the long and plentiful list of human atrocities and evil?  Germany was amongst the most powerful nations of the world and a leader in science, technology, medicine and engineering.  The German contributions to art, music, literature and philosophy put German culture at the heart of what we would call Western Civilization. And yet this supposedly civilized people turned their great achievements and progress towards planning and carrying out ruthless genocidal murder with scientific and economic efficiency.

For more on the Holocaust:

Yad Veshem

US Holocaust Memorial Museum

Jewish Virtual Library

Vancouver Holocaust Education Centre

Holocaust Memorial Day

By joe goldberg from Seattle, WA, USA (Half Mast) [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
source: CC-BY-SA-2.0 via Wikimedia Commons
Also known as Yom HaShoah in Hebrew, this day is observed in Israel and in local communities throughout the Jewish Diaspora.  It is a secular holiday, separate from the holy days of mourning in the religious calendar of Judaism.

More than 6 million Jews perished in the Holocaust.

For more information:

Jewish Virtual Library

Times of Israel

Vancouver HEC

 

Holocaust Memorial Day

By joe goldberg from Seattle, WA, USA (Half Mast) [CC-BY-SA-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
source: CC-BY-SA-2.0 via Wikimedia Commons
Also known as Yom HaShoah in Hebrew, this day is observed in Israel and in local communities throughout the Jewish Diaspora.  It is a secular holiday, separate from the holy days of mourning in the religious calendar of Judaism.

More than 6 million Jews perished in the Holocaust.

For more information:

Jewish Virtual Library

Times of Israel

Vancouver HEC