Freedom to Read; Obligation to Read

As Freedom to Read Week comes to an end, it bears considering that the freedom to read means nothing if citizens don’t exercise that that freedom.

“The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read.”

Source: Unknown*

The rights and freedoms of Canadians include the right to read what you want to read. Such rights and freedoms are fundamental to democracy. Yet there are forces at work in our society that seek power by attaching your rights, including attempts to censor or limit your freedom to read.

Authoritarian forces and totalitarian states know that uneducated and illiterate citizens are easier to control and oppress. Such forces can only celebrate that the work is much simpler when significant portions of the population choose not to read. Censorship becomes less pressing when “aliteracy” becomes prevalent.

A true democracy guarantees fundamental rights and freedoms to its citizens. But to work effectively, indeed, to survive, democracy requires that citizens exercise those rights. In particular, democracy breaks down if citizens aren’t educated, informed and active.

The rise of powerful new information technology in the last few decades has made it more important than ever that citizens are highly “information literate.” Citizens must not only have access to information, they must have the tools required to wade through increasingly destructive levels of misinformation, disinformation, propaganda, and outright lies. Citizens need to have access to information that is credible, accurate and trustworthy.

The rise of anti-intellectualism and anti-science movements, perhaps most recently represented by anti-vax conspiracies, are part of the wider breakdown of democratic institutions. There is little doubt that attacks on public education over many years have reaped some these results and are integral to the rise of authoritarianism.

It is not enough to celebrate the Freedom to Read. As citizens of democratic societies, we have an obligation to exercise our Freedom to Read, in part so that we are equipped to defend our democratic rights and freedoms.

It is clear that democracy is under attack, throughout the world, and in our back yard. We must act.



Note* The above quote, or variations on it, are often popularly attributed to Mark Twain. However the original source of this quote, or its variations, remains unclear.

Why should schools care about recreational reading?

Should teachers set aside time during the school day for kids to read for pleasure?

Yes.

Should schools do more to encourage kids to become recreational readers?

Yes.

Will there be enough of a payoff for our education system even if it means less time spent on other things?

Yes.

The answer to all these questions is most certainly yes.

Reading for pleasure, recreational reading, free voluntary reading, personal reading– whatever  you want to call it–  is built upon the intrinsic goal of reading because it directly benefits the reader: Reading for the sake of reading.  Yet there are myriad indirect benefits that come from recreational reading, many of which lead to profoundly positive educational outcomes.

Source: Freepik

A teacher should care that a student reads for pleasure, because reading brings pleasure to the student!  However, more than that, a teacher can also point to so many other benefits that come from recreational reading that will pay off in terms of academic achievement, social learning and character education.

If teachers (or parents, or administrators) are worried that the kids are missing out on valuable educational lessons, please remember this: Students who read more for pleasure will do better in school.  Recreational reading has many, many indirect educational benefits to students. Students who do more recreational reading will see improvements in vocabulary, writing skills, grammar, spelling, comprehension, critical thinking, concentration and so many other skills that are essential to one’s overall education.

Moreover, students who read more for pleasure will grow in social and emotional learning, as students can share in the experiences of different people, growing in empathy and understanding for people all backgrounds, ages, genders, orientations, beliefs and cultures.

As if those weren’t enough reasons for reading, here are some more. Reading books can help mitigate against the harmful effects of too much time spent on phones and in front of other screens. One simple and yet important example of this is that studies show that people who read from books or magazines before bed will sleep better than those who are looking at screens before trying to fall asleep.

There are so many reasons to read.

Schools need to do more to encourage kids to read for reading’s sake.  In doing so, the school will reap the rewards of having kids who do better in school.


October is International School Library Month
and Canadian Library Month.

International School Library Month

As October draws to a close, so does International School Library Month and Canadian Library Month.  We hope you learned something about the vital role that libraries play in our country, and that school libraries play in education around the globe. Most importantly, we hope you were able to celebrate the wonderful gift of libraries by visiting some, including your local public library, and especially, your school library.

Come down to see us in person, or visit online– even though October is ending, you can make use of your school library all year long.

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Drop Everything and Read

Today you have been challenged by the BCTF and BCTLA to Drop Everything and Read!   The DEAR Challenge is issued every year for BC School Library Day, in conjunction with Canadian Library Month and International School Library Month.

Every person in British Columbia, including every student and every teacher, is challenged to drop everything else and read a book.  Read for pleasure. Read for entertainment. Read for knowledge. Read for escape. Read for experiencing other places, other times, other lives. Read for the joy of it.

There are so many reasons to read.

Drop Everything and Read!

Library Themed Links

In keeping with the continuing celebration of all things library during International School Library Month and Canadian Library Month, here are some links to some interesting library themed content. Enjoy!

source: Neville Johnson / Mental Floss


October is International School Library Month
and Canadian Library Month.

Why read for pleasure?

Why read for pleasure?

Reason #1: Pleasure

source: iamse7en

There are countless reasons why people read.  And there are countless ways that reading for pleasure can bring you pleasure.

People read to be entertained.

People read to escape.

People read to be pulled into a story.

People read to laugh.

People read to cry.

People read to be scared.

People read to be amazed.

People read to experience other times.

People read to experience other places.

People read to share in the experiences of other people.

People read to learn something.

People read to relax.

People read to get motivated.

People read to be inspired.

People read to be thrilled.

People read to understand.

People read to be challenged.

People read to be reassured.

People read to see something new.

People read to see something familiar.

People read for so many reasons.

People read and they don’t know why, they just like it.


Visit your school library to find a book to read for pleasure–  that is the #1 reason we are here!


October is International School Library Month
and Canadian Library Month.

 

Election Day

Canadians go to the polls today to to elect our federal government. Voting is just one aspect of the democratic system, but it is a vital one. Canadians must cherish the right to vote, and must accept the serious responsibility to vote. It is the responsibility of each citizen in a democracy to get informed, think critically, and exercise the right to vote.

(Source: CC (Daro))

Our students are too young to vote now, but they will be eligible for the elections of the near future. And yet even without voting, our students are participants in the democratic system. High school is important for many different reasons. None is more important that preparing our kids to take on the responsibilities of democratic citizenship.  We want our kids to be Canadians that exercise, celebrate, and protect their rights as citizens in a democracy.

Libraries, including Public Libraries and School Libraries, can play a vital part in the equipping of our students for democratic citizenship.  Canadians must have access to reliable sources of information. Just as importantly, Canadians must be information literate. They must have the tools to be able to recognize unreliable sources, including disinformation, fake news, propaganda, etc.  They must be able to have confidence in recognizing and using reliable information to think critically and to make educated decisions about the issues facing our country, our cities, our neighbourhoods, and our world.


October is International School Library Month
and Canadian Library Month.

Believe in Yourself

Ziggy Marley was born on this day in 1968.  One of the children of reggae legend Bob Marley, Ziggy would go on to become a famous musician in his own right.  Many might disagree, but some feel his best work was “Believe in Yourself.”

“Believe in Yourself” is the theme song for “Arthur” the beloved animated program based on the books by Marc Brown.

ISLM and CLM Connections: Arthur gave us a library anthem, the “Library Card Song.”

Invest in Libraries

“The conservative, careful and fiscally responsible path to improving literacy is by investing in libraries and librarians.”

–Stephen Krashen

October is International School Library Month
and Canadian Library Month.

 

 

School Library Day AND Drop Everything and Read

School Library Day and the annual DEAR Challenge are coming up in a few weeks time. Start planning the party!

 

Monday, October 28, 2019
BC School Library Day
Canada School Library Day
Drop Everything and Read

 

International School Library Month AND Canadian Library Month

Celebrate the vital role that school libraries play in education around the world.

 

 

Celebrate the vital role that libraries of all sorts play in Canadian society.

source: librarianship.ca