Summer Reading

The Summer Reading Library Cart is making its way around the building. Staff are encouraged to have a look and pick up something for reading over the break!

Come down to the school library for more selections. Students and staff are reminded that we have THOUSANDS of books in the School Library and that we would love to have you take home some books to enjoy for some summer reading.

2021 Teen Summer Adventure: Time Travel Edition

From Surrey Libraries:

Sign up for the 2021 Teen Summer Adventure (TSR).

Combat summer brain drain with our All-Access Passport to summer fun!

Need some inspiration for how to spend the summer?

Get ready to go back in time with Surrey Libraries’ Teen Summer Adventure 2021, Time Travel Edition (Ages 12-18)

Combat summer brain drain with our All-Access Passport to summer fun! Our All-Access Passport is filled with time travel themed challenges and activities you can do all summer long. Complete activities to earn tickets that go toward 8 weekly prizes and 3 summer-end grand prize draws!

Sign up by July 10 to be eligible for all 8 weekly prizes!

Go to Surrey Libraries to find out more.

A Curse So Dark and Lonely

The Surrey Teens Read book of the year, as selected by the students of Surrey Schools, is A Curse So Dark and Lonely by Brigid Kemmerer.


Thanks to all the students who voted in this year’s Surrey Teens Read. And special thanks to the Teacher Librarians on the Committee for all their work running this program. Every year they manage to come up with a slate of outstanding titles for Surrey Teens Read. Once again they gave the students of our district an enjoyable set of books to read during the 2020-2021. We are already looking forward to the next set of nominated titles for 2021-2022.

Find out more: Surrey Teens Read

Malcolm X


Born on this day in 1925, Malcolm Little grew up in poverty and lived a life of crime. While in prison he worked to self-educate and converted to Islam, Publicly he became known as Malcolm X, dropping what he referred to as his “slave name.” Intelligent, articulate and charismatic, Malcolm X would become one of the leading figures of the fight for equality for African-Americans. In contrast to Martin Luther King who called for non-violent protest, Malcolm X believed that violence would be necessary for black people to gain their rights. Early on he was considered to be a black-supremacist who believed that blacks and whites could never live together. However, he would eventually disavow that position, and would preach the equality of all people and express a hope for peaceful coexistence. In the years prior to his death, he began to reach out with a willingness to work with other Civil Rights groups and leaders. In particular it was after the Hajj, the pilgrimage to Mecca required of all Muslims, where he experienced the coming together of people of all races and backgrounds, that he embraced the possibility of peaceful change rather than inevitable violence. Tragically, he wouldn’t live long in pursuit of those dreams. He was assassinated in 1965 by members of the group he formerly led, the Nation of Islam.

For more on the life of Malcolm X:

MalcolmX.com (official website of the estate of Malcolm X)

The Malcolm X Project at Columbia University

American Experience: Timeline of Malcolm X

Malcolm

Award Winners

Come down to the School Library to see our display of recent “Award Winners.”

The Printz Award and the Alex Awards are significant honours to consider when adding title to a secondary school library collection. The Printz Award is given for excellence in young adult literature, while the Alex Awards are given to books written for adults but that have special appeal to young adults and teens.

The Printz Award is “for a book that exemplifies literary excellence in young adult literature.” (ALA) The 2021 Printz Award was given to Everything Sad Is Untrue (a true story) by Daniel Nayeri. In this autobiographical novel, middle-schooler Daniel, formerly Khosrou, tells his unimpressed and at times cruel classmates about his experience as an Iranian refugee.



Printz Honors were awarded to Apple (Skin to the Core) by Eric Gansworth; Dragon Hoops created by Gene Luen Yang; Every Body Looking by Candice Iloh; and We Are Not Free by Traci Chee.

The Alex Awards “are given to ten books written for adults that have special appeal to young adults, ages 12 through 18.” (ALA) This year the Alex Awards were presented to the following titles:

· Black Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse

· The House in the Cerulean Sea by TJ Klune

· The Impossible First by Colin O’Brady

· Kent State: Four Dead in Ohio by Derf Backderf

· The Kids Are Gonna Ask by Gretchen Anthony

· The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones

· Plain Bad Heroines by emily m. danforth

· Riot Baby by Tochi Onyebuchi

· Solutions and Other Problems by Allie Brosh

· We Ride Upon Sticks: A Novel by Quan Barry


Find out more about all the other books and authors that were honoured with these very prestigious awards in the world of youth and children’s literature: ALA Youth Media Awards.