FAQ

Question:

For how long can I take out books or magazines?

Answer:

Regular fiction or non-fiction books can be taken out for 3 weeks. Magazines and graphic novels can be borrowed for 1 week. Reference books can be taken out for 1 day while restricted reference books are for library use only. For more info click here

Question:

Do you have old editions of magazines?

Answer:

Yes, you can often find older editions of magazines on the shelves underneath the “flip up” display shelves.  These can be borrowed, just as you would borrow the newer editions.   You can also find discarded magazines in the discard cupboard.  These discards can be taken to keep.

Question:

How many books or magazines can I borrow?

Answer:

You can borrow up to three books or magazines at any one time.

Question:

Can I use the library computers to play games?

Answer:

Yes and no. First priority on the library computers is for educational use only. Students wanting to do research or work on school projects and assignments need to have access to the library computers. Also note that classes that are booked into the library have priority on the computers over drop in/study block students.  At slow times, if there are free spaces and you are not disturbing anyone, you might play games.

Question:

Is Mr. Sexton the best teacher librarian in the history of the world?

Answer:

Yes.

Question:

What is with the duck?

Answer:

If by “what is with the duck?” you mean to ask “why is there a duck in the library?” all I can say is that you should ask him yourself. His name is Buck. Buck the Duck. Buck the Library Duck. You can also check out his blog by clicking here.

Question:

Does the duck bite?

Answer:

If you continue to refer to him as “the duck” instead of using his name, “Buck,” then I would suggest that Buck will not be gentle with you.

Question:

What is a call number?

Answer:

In a library, the call number is like the “address” of the book. Call numbers let you know where you can find the book on the shelves. Call numbers are in the catalog information and are found on the spine labels of books.

Question:

Does this library use the Dewey Decimal system or the Library of Congress system, or another system for classifying and cataloging library materials?

Answer:

We are so impressed by that question!  We use the Dewey Decimal system.

Question:

Fiction is fake and Non-Fiction is true.  Do you agree?

Answer:

No.  That is not a good way of describing the difference between Fiction and Non-Fiction. Some might argue that Fiction can often be “truer” than Non-Fiction.  It is complicated, but here is a quick answer that might be helpful. Fiction refers to made-up stories while Non-Fiction refers to factual information.

Fiction is the product of the imagination, in which the events did not actually happen. Non-Fiction refers to written works which are not products of the imagination but are attempts to portray factual information about real life. However, there is often overlap between the two, and instead of the difference being black or white, like most things in life, there are often many shades of gray.  Historical Fiction is an example of made up stories set within real historical contexts and often involving real people from history.  This can be very confusing.  More of a problem is that some things can be presented as Non-Fiction when they are actually lies, jokes or simply incorrect information. Meanwhile, Fiction can often reveal great truths about reality while presenting a made-up story.

Question:

Does the duck have large talons?

Answer:

I don’t understand a word you just said.

Question:

Can I print in the library?

Answer:

Yes. There is one printing station near the entrance. Click here to find out more.

Question:

I was told that fiction books are organized alphabetically by author’s name. However, I went looking for books by John Green in the “J” section and couldn’t find any. Why is that?

Answer:

When things are organized by a person’s name, most of the time it is by LAST NAME. Go to the “G” shelves. (BTW, if a Library Team member asks you for your name so that she can look you up in the catalog, she means your last name, not your first name.)

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