Shanah Tovah!


Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year feast and celebration.

source: CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons

The Jewish Calendar is a lunar calendar, therefor the dates of Rosh Hashanah and other Jewish holidays will vary according to the Gregorian Calendar (the standard calendar used in most of the world for politics, business and daily life.)  In 2021 Rosh Hashanah begins at Sundown on September 6 and ends at nightfall of September 8.

Shanah Tovah!


Rosh Hashanah

source: time.com

Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year feast and celebration.

The Jewish Calendar is a lunar calendar, therefor the dates of Rosh Hashanah and other Jewish holidays will vary according to the Gregorian Calendar (the standard calendar used in most of the world for politics, business and daily life.)  In 2020 Rosh Hashanah begins at Sundown on September 18 and ends at nightfall of September 20.


 

Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year feast and celebration.

The Jewish Calendar is a lunar calendar, therefor the dates of Rosh Hashanah and other Jewish holidays will vary according to the Gregorian Calendar (the standard calendar used in most of the world for politics, business and daily life.)  In 2016 Rosh Hashanah begins at Sundown on October 3 and ends at nightfall of October 4.

Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah is the Jewish New Year feast and celebration.

The Jewish Calendar is a lunar calendar, therefor the dates of Rosh Hashanah and other Jewish holidays will vary according to the Gregorian Calendar (the standard calendar used in most of the world for politics, business and daily life.)  In 2015 Rosh Hashanah begins at Sundown on September 13 and ends at nightfall of September 15.

Happy New Year

Happy New Year 2015!2015

Today is the first day of the year on the Gregorian Calendar and the first day of 2015 according the Anno Domini reckoning of years.

Of course, a “New Year’s Day” is an arbitrary notion and is celebrated at various times according to the traditions of different religions, cultures and nationalities. January 1st was adopted as the start of the year sometime during the era of the Roman Empire. During the Middle Ages, most European countries celebrated the New Year in the Spring. However, by the time the Gregorian Calendar began to be adopted by most Western nations, January 1st became the standard for celebrating the New Year.