National Day for Truth and Reconciliation


Our school will be closed tomorrow, September 30th, 2021, in observance of the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. Please be sure to take some time to consider why this is more than just a day off from school. Learn more about what “Truth and Reconciliation” means. Learn more about the history of the residential schools system and the horror of its legacy, the effects of which are still felt in Canada now and will be into the foreseeable future.

Listen to Phyllis Webstad tell her story, learn more about residential schools, the history of Orange Shirt Day, and the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation
(source: orangeshirtday.org)


Education is a vital piece in the pursuit of Truth and Reconciliation. Here are links to just some of the many online resources that are available so that you can learn more.


Find out more:

Orange Shirt Day


Wear an orange shirt to school on Wednesday, September 29

September 30th is Truth and Reconciliation Day in Canada. Our school, most public institutions around the province, and many public institutions around the country, will be closed. At Lord Tweedsmuir Secondary, we encourage all students and staff to wear an orange shirt in school on Wednesday, September 29, as well as on September 30th.

source: Province of British Columbia

The National Day for Truth and Reconciliation was established as the Canadian government’s formal recognition of the importance of Orange Shirt Day, observed on September 30 over most of the last decade, as part of the overall effort of raising awareness and provoking discussion about the impact of Residential Schools in Canada, and finding the path toward reconciliation.

Emily Carr

source: emilycarr.ca

On this day in 1871, Emily Carr, an iconic figure in Canadian art and culture, was born in Victoria. Emily Carr is known all over the world, particularly for her paintings inspired by the forests of British Columbia and the indigenous people of Pacific coast. In addition to painting, Emily was also a writer and poet.  Like most artists, she achieved her greatest fame and critical recognition later in life and after her death.  For more on the life and work of this great Canadian, go to:

source: bcheritage.ca